La LEBENSREFORM ad Ascona ma anche in California e lì diventa movimento …

 

TESTO IN ITALIANO TRADOTTO AUTOMATICAMENTE PIÙ IN BASSO … SCROLLARE PF

 

A Brief History of the Hippies

Todd Strasser

Todd Strasser

Mar 3, 2019·5 min read

Image for post

Here’s some interesting information that may explain “the origins” of the 1960s hippie movement. I hasten to add that, having no training in sociology, I can’t claim total accuracy. What is known is that back in the late 1800s there was a social movement in Germany called “naturmenschen” or nature men, who rejected industrialization and the “unnatural” trends of urbanization and who adopted a “back to nature” creed. In the early 1900s a few naturmenschen moved to the United States and settled in California. One was Hermann Sexauer, “a philosophical anarchist, a radical pacifist, a theoretical nudist, and an anti-communist,” who opened a natural foods store in Santa Barbara. Another was William Pester, who left Germany to avoid military service and settled in Palm Canyon, California. (That’s him sitting in front of his hut with what looks like a dobro on his lap. Photo supposedly taken in 1917.)

Next came John Richter, son of German immigrants, who believed in “transcendentalist philosophy, wearing long hair and a beard and eating only raw fruits and vegetables.” Richter opened the Eutropheon, a health food store on Laurel Canyon Blvd in Los Angeles, where a group of young men (where were the women?) hung out who would eventually be dubbed the “California Nature Boys.” Beat Generation author Jack Kerouac wrote in On the Road that he saw “an occasional Nature Boy saint in beard and sandals” while passing through L.A. in 1947.

Another seminal figure in the American hippie movement was eden ahbez (1908–1995) who adopted and promoted a lifestyle in California that became something of a blueprint for the future counter-culture of the 1960s.

ahbez eschewed capital letters in his name, claiming that only the words God and Infinity were worthy of capitalization. He was born in Brooklyn, NY and grew up in Kansas. During the 1930s, he performed as a pianist and dance band leader. In 1941, he arrived in Los Angeles and began playing piano in the Eutropheon, a small health food store and raw food restaurant on Laurel Canyon Boulevard. The cafe was owned by John and Vera Richter, whom I wrote about in the first installment of this hippie history thread. Like other proto-hippies of the time, the Richters followed a German Naturmensch and Lebensreform philosophy.

ahbez took to wearing sandals, shoulder-length hair, a beard, and white robes. For a while he camped out below the first L in the Hollywood Sign above Los Angeles and studied Oriental mysticism. He slept outdoors with his family and ate vegetables, fruits, and nuts. He claimed to live on three dollars per week.

Strangely, ahbez’s life took a non-hippish turn in 1947 when he approached Nat “King” Cole’s manager backstage at the Lincoln Theater in Los Angeles and handed him the music for a song he’d written called, “Nature Boy” and then disappeared. Cole loved the song and began playing it for live audiences to much acclaim, but needed to track down its author before he could release a recording of it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iq0XJCJ1Srw

ahbez was discovered living under the Hollywood Sign and became the focus of a media frenzy when Cole’s version of “Nature Boy” shot to №1 on the Billboard charts and remained there for eight weeks. In early 1948, RKO Radio Pictures paid ahbez $10,000 for the rights to “Nature Boy” to use as the theme song for their film The Boy With Green Hair. He was credited as the song’s composer on the opening titles of the film.

Frank Sinatra and Sarah Vaughan later released versions of the song. ahbez continued to supply Cole with songs, including “Land of Love (Come My Love and Live with Me)”, which was also covered by Doris Day and The Ink Spots. In the mid 1950s, he wrote songs for Eartha Kitt, Frankie Laine, as well as writing some rock-and-roll novelty songs. In 1957, his song “Lonely Island” was recorded by Sam Cooke, becoming the second and final ahbez composition to hit the Top 40.

Gypsy Boots was another of the proto-hippies who may have served as models for what was eventually labeled the “1960s counter culture.” They included Hermann Sexauer, “a philosophical anarchist, radical pacifist, and theoretical nudist,” who opened a natural foods store in Santa Barbara around 1916; William Pester, who left Germany to avoid military service and settled in Palm Canyon, California around the same time; John Richter, son of German immigrants, who believed in “transcendentalist philosophy, wearing long hair and a beard and eating only raw fruits and vegetables,” and opened the Eutropheon, a health food store on Laurel Canyon Blvd in Los Angeles, where a group of young men (where were the women?) hung out who would eventually be dubbed the “California Nature Boys.” One of them was eden ahbez, who eschewed capital letters in his name, claiming that only the words God and Infinity were worthy of capitalization, and camped out below the first L in the Hollywood Sign above Los Angeles. Oddly, he would eventually write songs for Nat “King” Cole, Earth Kitt and Sam Cooke.

Boots, whose given name was Robert Bootzin, was one of the nature boys, and may have been the first to invent the drink we now call the smoothie. Born in 1914, he dropped out of high school in the 1930s to wander California with other “vagabonds” and eventually settled in Tahquitz Canyon near Palm Springs, where he and others slept in caves and bathed in waterfalls. Decades ahead of the Hippie movement, Bootzin and his companions grew long hair and beards, lived a carefree existence and were seasonal fruit pickers. Later he opened a health food store, the “Health Hut” in LA, which was patronized by dozens of Hollywood celebrities in the early 1960s.

Bootzin received national exposure in 1955, when he appeared on Groucho Marx’s TV show You Bet Your Life. Introduced as “Boots Bootzin,” he espoused his philosophy of clean living, exercise, and healthy eating. Bootzin went on to become a regular guest on American television talk shows in the 1960s, appearing 25 times on The Steve Allen Show where he would often play up his role as a health advocate by swinging from a vine onto stage. It was on Allen’s show that he introduced a fruit health drink he called a smoothie.”

TESTO IN ITALIANO TRADOTTO AUTOMATICAMENTE (NON CORRETTO)

Una breve storia degli Hippies
Todd Strasser
Todd Strasser
3 mar, 2019-5 min lette

Immagine per il post
Ecco alcune informazioni interessanti che possono spiegare “le origini” del movimento hippie degli anni Sessanta. Mi affretto ad aggiungere che, non avendo alcuna formazione in sociologia, non posso pretendere una precisione totale. Quello che si sa è che già alla fine dell’Ottocento c’era in Germania un movimento sociale chiamato “naturmenschen” o uomini della natura, che rifiutava l’industrializzazione e le tendenze “innaturali” dell’urbanizzazione e che adottava il credo del “ritorno alla natura”. All’inizio del 1900 alcuni naturmenschen si trasferirono negli Stati Uniti e si stabilirono in California. Uno di loro era Hermann Sexauer, “un anarchico filosofico, un pacifista radicale, un nudista teorico e un anticomunista”, che aprì un negozio di alimenti naturali a Santa Barbara. Un altro era William Pester, che lasciò la Germania per evitare il servizio militare e si stabilì a Palm Canyon, in California. (È lui seduto davanti alla sua capanna con quello che sembra un dobro sulle ginocchia. Foto scattata presumibilmente nel 1917).
Poi è arrivato John Richter, figlio di immigrati tedeschi, che credeva nella “filosofia trascendentalista, con i capelli lunghi e la barba e mangiando solo frutta e verdura cruda”. Richter aprì l’Eutropheon, un negozio di cibi salutari sulla Laurel Canyon Blvd a Los Angeles, dove un gruppo di giovani uomini (dov’erano le donne?) frequentava un locale che alla fine fu soprannominato “California Nature Boys”. L’autore della Beat Generation Jack Kerouac ha scritto su On the Road che nel 1947, mentre passava per Los Angeles, nel 1947, vide “un santo occasionale dei Nature Boy con barba e sandali”.
Immagine per il post
Un’altra figura fondamentale del movimento hippie americano fu eden ahbez (1908-1995) che adottò e promosse uno stile di vita in California che divenne una sorta di progetto per la futura controcultura degli anni Sessanta.
ahbez evitava le lettere maiuscole nel suo nome, sostenendo che solo le parole Dio e Infinito erano degne di maiuscola. Nato a Brooklyn, NY, è cresciuto in Kansas. Durante gli anni ’30, si esibì come pianista e leader di una band di ballo. Nel 1941, arrivò a Los Angeles e iniziò a suonare il pianoforte nell’Eutropheon, un piccolo negozio di cibi salutari e ristorante di cibi crudi su Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Il caffè era di proprietà di John e Vera Richter, di cui ho scritto nella prima puntata di questo filo di storia hippie. Come altri proto-hippie dell’epoca, i Richter seguivano una filosofia tedesca Naturmensch e Lebensreform.
ahbez si mise a indossare sandali, capelli lunghi fino alle spalle, barba e vestaglie bianche. Per un po’ di tempo si accampò sotto la prima L nel segno di Hollywood sopra Los Angeles e studiò il misticismo orientale. Dormiva all’aperto con la sua famiglia e mangiava verdure, frutta e noci. Affermava di vivere con tre dollari a settimana.
Immagine per il post
Stranamente, la vita di Ahbez ha preso una piega non ippica nel 1947 quando si è avvicinato al manager di Nat “King” Cole nel backstage del Lincoln Theater di Los Angeles e gli ha consegnato la musica di una canzone che aveva scritto, “Nature Boy”, e poi è scomparso. Cole amava la canzone e iniziò a suonarla per il pubblico dal vivo con grande successo, ma aveva bisogno di rintracciare il suo autore prima di poterne pubblicare una registrazione.

ahbez è stato scoperto vivendo sotto l’insegna di Hollywood ed è diventato il centro di una frenesia mediatica quando la versione di Cole di “Nature Boy” è stata girata al №1 delle classifiche Billboard e vi è rimasta per otto settimane. All’inizio del 1948, la RKO Radio Pictures pagò ad ahbez 10.000 dollari per i diritti di “Nature Boy” da usare come colonna sonora del loro film The Boy With Green Hair. Fu accreditato come compositore della canzone nei titoli di testa del film.
Frank Sinatra e Sarah Vaughan hanno poi pubblicato versioni successive della canzone. ahbez ha continuato a fornire a Cole canzoni, tra cui “Land of Love (Come My Love and Live with Me)”, che è stato anche coperto da Doris Day e The Ink Spots. A metà degli anni Cinquanta, scrisse canzoni per Eartha Kitt, Frankie Laine, oltre a scrivere alcune novità rock-and-roll. Nel 1957, la sua canzone “Lonely Island” fu registrata da Sam Cooke, diventando la seconda e ultima composizione ahbez ad entrare nella Top 40.
Immagine per il post
Gypsy Boots era un altro dei proto-hippies che potrebbe essere servito da modello per quella che alla fine è stata etichettata come la “controcultura degli anni Sessanta”. Tra questi c’erano Hermann Sexauer, “un anarchico filosofico, pacifista radicale e nudista teorico”, che aprì un negozio di cibi naturali a Santa Barbara intorno al 1916; William Pester, che lasciò la Germania per evitare il servizio militare e si stabilì a Palm Canyon, California, più o meno nello stesso periodo; John Richter, figlio di immigrati tedeschi, che credeva nella “filosofia trascendentalista, con i capelli lunghi e la barba e che mangiava solo frutta e verdura cruda”, e aprì l’Eutropheon, un negozio di alimenti naturali sulla Laurel Canyon Blvd a Los Angeles, dove un gruppo di giovani uomini (dov’erano le donne? ) che alla fine sarebbero stati soprannominati i “California Nature Boys”. Uno di loro era eden ahbez, che evitava le lettere maiuscole nel suo nome, sostenendo che solo le parole Dio e Infinito erano degne di maiuscola, e si accampava sotto la prima L nel segno di Hollywood sopra Los Angeles. Stranamente, alla fine avrebbe scritto canzoni per Nat “King” Cole, Earth Kitt e Sam Cooke.
Boots, il cui nome di battesimo era Robert Bootzin, era uno dei ragazzi della natura, e potrebbe essere stato il primo a inventare la bevanda che oggi chiamiamo frullato. Nato nel 1914, lasciò il liceo negli anni ’30 per vagabondare in California con altri “vagabondi” e alla fine si stabilì a Tahquitz Canyon vicino a Palm Springs, dove lui e altri dormivano nelle grotte e facevano il bagno nelle cascate. Decenni prima del movimento Hippie, Bootzin e i suoi compagni si facevano crescere i capelli lunghi e la barba, vivevano un’esistenza spensierata ed erano raccoglitori di frutta di stagione. Più tardi aprì un negozio di cibi salutari, il “Health Hut” a Los Angeles, che fu patrocinato da decine di celebrità di Hollywood nei primi anni Sessanta.
Bootzin ha ricevuto l’esposizione nazionale nel 1955, quando è apparso nel programma televisivo di Groucho Marx You Bet Your Life. Introdotto come “Boots Bootzin”, ha sposato la sua filosofia di vita pulita, esercizio fisico e alimentazione sana. Bootzin è diventato un ospite abituale dei talk show televisivi americani negli anni Sessanta, apparendo 25 volte nel The Steve Allen Show, dove spesso recitava il suo ruolo di sostenitore della salute dondolando da una vite sul palco. Fu nel programma di Allen che introdusse una bevanda salutare alla frutta che chiamò frullato”.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s